Sophie Blackall

Sophie Blackall

Sophie Blackall grew up in Australia where she learned to draw on the beach with sticks, which has not altogether helped her sense of perspective. She completed a Bachelor of Design in Sydney, which furnished her with useful Letraset, bromide and enlarger machine skills. The following few years were spent painting robotic characters for theme parks, providing the hands for a DIY television show, and writing a household hints column.

In 2000, Blackall was inveigled by New York. She convinced her husband, and two small children (who couldn't talk and had no say in the matter), to pack suitcases and sense of adventure and join the diaspora. After two months of pounding the streets, portfolio in hand, and despite the tireless efforts of her agent, the return plane ticket was cashed in to pay the rent. Just when the highlight in the day had become half a can of Budweiser at six o'clock, the fax machine coughed and spluttered and delivered a commission of nine illustrations for The New York Times.

After lots of editorial work and several animated TV commercials in the UK, the first children's book Sophie Blackall illustrated was Ruby's Wish by Shirin Yim Bridges (Chronicle), which won the Ezra Jack Keats award in 2003.

Since then, she has illustrated Meet Wild Boars by Meg Rosoff (Holt) which won the Society of Illustrators Founders Award; Summer is Summer by Phillis and David Gershator (Holt); What’s So Bad About Being an Only Child? by Cari Best (FSG); Red Butterfly by Deborah Noyes (Candlewick); Ivy and Bean (books one through five) by Annie Barrows (Chronicle); Jumpy Jack and Googily by Meg Rosoff (Holt); Wild Boars Cook by Meg Rosoff (Holt); and Wombat Walkabout by Carol Diggory Shields (Dutton).

In the rare moments that Blackall is away from her desk, she can be found in the kitchen making preposterous birthday cakes for her children or wandering the flea markets in a daze.

Books by Sophie Blackall